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Crisis over, Egypt?

16 Aug 2013 9:37 pm

Problems on hold


At last, the mandate Egyptians gave the military on 26 July to battle the terrorism inflicted upon them by the Muslim Brothers (MB) has been put into effect. The security apparatus moved

At last, the mandate Egyptians gave the military on 26 July to battle the terrorism inflicted upon them by the Muslim Brothers (MB) has been put into effect. The security apparatus moved with remarkable wisdom and self-restraint to put an end to the sit-ins conducted by the Islamist Mursi supporters in the east Cairo quarter of Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, and in the vicinity of Nahda Square in Giza, west of Cairo. Security sent a clarion message to the squatters and the entire world that the patience of Egyptians had run out. The Islamists had trifled long enough with the country’s destiny, and had defied the State’s sovereignty and prestige. 
Egyptians woke up last Wednesday morning to news that the operation to break-up the two sit-ins had started. A general sense of relief set in, especially given the foreboding and bitterness Egyptians had sustained since 4 July, the date the sit-ins began with the purpose of protesting against the ouster of the Islamist president Mursi.  Yet is could not escape anyone that there was an official reluctance to end the havoc and terrorism wreaked by the MB and their supporters. It took the State some six weeks since Mursi’s overthrow to stand up to the MB outlaw activity and hooliganism. That fateful Wednesday, Egyptians held their breath as they followed the break-up of the sit-ins live on TV. Their hearts went out to the security soldiers and officers who valiantly and honourably risked their lives while bullets of treachery targeted them by the devil’s advocates who seemed bent on severing all ties with Mother Egypt before they left.
It is obvious the MBs are not leaving without spilling their venom into the veins and hearts of Egypt, in gruesome deeds that will go down in history for their viciousness. Through upholding their interests and agenda to the detriment of Egypt, the MB have themselves written the appalling end to their 80-year long history in Egypt. It is now time for Egypt to come out of the dark tunnel, even if at the painful cost of some of her dearest and noblest children. Egypt will emerge out of her battle with terrorism victorious, with head held high.
The Copts especially have paid a hefty cost in churches and livelihoods during the fight against terrorism. But this is not the time to wail over burnt or ruined churches, because we know that Copts were targeted on account of their patriotic stance, since they stood hand in hand alongside their Muslim fellow-Egyptians to defend Egypt and rescue her from hijacking by the Islamists. What we most need now is for the Christian Muslim bond that was created and nurtured in the endeavour to fight the MB, and defend Egypt and Egyptianness, to live on. We should now strive to preserve this unity and focus on the triumph of the nation, its constitution, parliament and president. And I tell Copts: don’t worry about Egypt’s churches; they will be rebuilt by the joint efforts of her Muslims and Christians.
WATANI International
18 August 2013


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