Latest News

Islamists avenge themselves upon the Copts

Nader Shukry -Tereza Hanna

04 Jul 2013 7:32 pm

Once Colonel General Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi had announced the ouster of Mursi, and it became obvious to all Egyptians that the Islamists had been forced out of power

Once Colonel General Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi had announced the ouster of Mursi, and it became obvious to all Egyptians that the Islamists had been forced out of power, their supporters embarked on a last battle to avenge themselves. In several places in Egypt they assaulted or shot at civilians who celebrated the fall of the regime. Some 12 Egyptians, three among whom were children, lost their lives; and close to 280 were injured.
In the coastal town of Marsa Matrouh some 300km west of Alexandria, and in Deir Muwwas in Minya, Upper Egypt, the Copts came under attack.
In Matrouh, dozens of Islamists tried to break into the church of the Holy Virgin. When the police shot at them, they went into the side streets and attacked the shops owned by Copts, plundering and destroying what they can. They tried to torch three shops, but the locals put out the fires. They broke the façade of a Coptic-owned hotel and went through the streets shouting “Islamiya, Islamiya” and other Islamic slogans. The police chased them and there was an exchange of gunfire. Finally, the police was able to bring about calm late in the evening.
And in the village of Dalaga in Deir Muwwas in Minya, an Islamist attack against the Copts was only contained when military reinforcements arrived. Eyewitnesses say that, once the ouster of Mursi had been publicised, dozens of Mursi supporters gathered and mobbed around the streets of Dalaga. They tried to break into the Mar-Girgis (St George) church, but could not do so because its sturdy iron gates were secure. They turned then to a nearby guesthouse owned by the church and assaulted it, looted its contents and set it ablaze. The priest who lives there, Fr Ayoub was able to escape by jumping off the roof to the roof of the neighbouring house. The neighbours hid him from the mob.
Several of the locals said the mob beat at their doors and gates and, even though they were not able to get in, caused immense terror.
Matters only calmed down at noon on the following day, Thursday, when extra forces were sent by the military.
WATANI International
4 July 2013


Related Topics

“Not shaken, not beaten”

How now freedom of…

A history of revolt

The hidden report

Editorial

Before the Law for Building Churches:The Copts’ constitutional right to pray

More